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Poster: dan b Date: Mar 21, 2004 7:05am
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: Calvin Workshop Films

The Calvin Workshop Films are incredible! I too want to make sure I catch them all. The first one I saw was Your Name Here, and ever since then I have been completely addicted to this site. My son Adam roars hysterically throughout the monkey film. I've often wondered if I've missed any. I'll do the Calvin search. Anybody know whatever became of The Calvin Workshop?

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Poster: uniQ Date: Mar 21, 2004 9:41pm
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: Calvin Workshop Films

As far as Google knows, The Calvin Company (Now dead), had 'Workshops' where industrial filmmakers could improve their skills and interact with oneanother. So Calvin Workshop films are really a bunch of ppl from probably different companies having fun.

That explains alot in my mind about 'Your Name Here', and others.

-uniQ

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Poster: Mr. Date: Jun 10, 2005 1:47am
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: Calvin Workshop Films

The Calvin Workshop was actually just an annual get-together for industrial filmmakers in Kansas City, Missouri. You see, the Calvin Company was founded in 1931 by F.O. Calvin and was headquartered in Kansas City. In a period of just six or seven years, it became the largest industrial film producer in the world, and was known as a brand name of merit across the country. Then World War II came along, Calvin started producing training films for the Navy, and they became even bigger and better. In the early 1950s, they were really on top of the industrial film world. That was when one of their 200-person staff was a young director named Robert Altman, who later directed classic films like "M*A*S*H" and "Nashville." In fact, Altman's first feature film, "The Delinquents," made in Kansas City while he was still working at Calvin, included many Calvin people in the cast and crew (because he didn't have many other sources to draw from).

The Calvin Company started holding annual workshops in Kansas City which would attract over 450 producers and technicians from all over the country to improve and orient their industrial filmmaking. Every year, one or two intentionally humorous films were produced specially for entertainment at the workshops, but NOT by the workshop people, but by the usual Calvin people. They usually poked fun at the industrial film business, because everybody who was there was involved in that business. The director of these films was Frank Barhydt, who was production head at Calvin and whose name is visible on the slates for the "Your Name Here" outtakes.

The Calvin Company's business began to decline in the late 1960s, when industrial films started to go out of style in favor of industrial VIDEOS, and Calvin closed up shop sometime in the late '70s.